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Time/Data/Visualisation

Time/Data/Visualisation

Challenges for Time as Digital Data

I have recently been invited to present my research at the Herrenhausen Conference on Digital Humanities. The Volkswagen Foundation, who organised the event, offered travel grants for young researchers to present their research topic in a short talk and a poster. Instead of presenting my research as a whole (which we PhD students have to do over and over again), I chose to talk only about an aspect of it: the problem of representing time digitally.

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Read on for the paper on which my talk was based. I presented it, along with this poster, at the Herrenhausen Conference: “(Digital) Humanities Revisited — Challenges and Opportunitiesin the Digital Age” at the Herrenhausen Palace, Hanover/Germany, December 5-7, 2013.

In digital humanities, there usually is a gap between digitally stored data and the collected data. The gap is due to the (structural) changes that data needs to undergo in order to be stored within a digital structure. This gap may be small, in the case of natively digital data such as a message on Twitter: a tweet can be stored close to its ‘original’ format, but it still looses a lot of its frame of reference (the potential audience at a specific point in time, the actual audience, the potential triggers of the message etc.). In digital humanities this distance may become so large that some researchers argue, the term data should be largely abandoned and replaced with capta. Capta, the taken, in contrast to data, the given, should emphasise the interpretative and observer dependent nature of data in the humanities [1]. This problem relates to all kinds of data, whether categorical, quantitative, spatial or temporal. I will however focus only on the last type. Time and temporal expressions are particularly susceptible to multiple modes of interpretation and (unintended) modifications due to limitations in digital data structures, but also due to the ambiguous and subjective nature of time itself.

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[1] Johanna Drucker, Humanities approaches to graphical display, 2011